Tag Archives: Ray Bradbury

Neil Gaiman on Ray Bradbury

From TimesOnline (UK), “Neil Gaiman: Ray Bradbury made me want to write”. (Me too.)

I can imagine all sorts of worlds and Buy propecia online places, but I cannot imagine one without Ray Bradbury. Not Bradbury the man (I have met him. Each time I have spent any time with him I have been left the happier for it), but Bradbury the builder of dreams. The man who took an idea of the American Midwest and made it magical and tangible, who took his own childhood and all the people and things in it and used it to shape the No prescription levitra world. The man who gave us a future to fear, one without stories, without books. The man who invented Hallowe’en in its modern incarnation.

There are authors I remember for their stories, others I remember for their people. Bradbury is the only one I remember who sticks in my heart for his times of year and for his places. He called a book of short stories The October Country. It’s the perfect Bradbury title. It gives us a time (and not just any time, but the month that contains Hallowe’en, when the twigs tap on windows and Generic viagra tadalafil things lurk in the cellars) and it makes it a country. You can go there. It’s waiting.

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Potential anniversary-themed reads for 2010

A few months ago I got the idea to create a reading queue based on anniversary. There were quite a few great books celebrating more or less significant birthdays in 2009.

Continuing the idea, here’s a list of Amoxil for sale possibilities to choose from for 2010, with the Generic cialis ordinal in parentheses. The list is skewed to 20th Century lit since I didn’t go farther back in my searching except for certain authors — there will be scads of additional selections available if you feel like looking around. Feel free to offer any other suggestions in the comments.

I’ll strike out those I get around to reading during the year.

  • The Brothers Karamazov (130th) – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Rhinoceros (50th) – Eugene Ionesco
  • The Town and the City (60th) – Jack Kerouac
  • Immortality (20th) – Milan Kundera
  • Devil in a Blue Dress (20th) – Walter Mosley
  • Skinny Legs and All (20th) – Tom Robbins
  • Cosmos (30th) – Carl Sagan
  • The Bachelors (50th) – Muriel Spark
  • The Ballad of Peckham Road (50th) – Muriel Spark
  • The Snake’s Pass (120th) – Bram Stoker
  • The Sleeper Awakes (100th) – H.G. Wells
  • Jeeves in the Offing (50th) – P.G. Wodehouse

Complete:

  • The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (30th) – Douglas Adams
  • I, Robot (60th) – Isaac Asimov
  • The Handmaid’s Tale (25th) – Margaret Atwood
  • Martian Chronicles (60th) – Ray Bradbury
  • Ender’s Game (25th) – Orson Scott Card
  • The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (10th) – Michael Chabon
  • Farewell, My Lovely (70th) – Raymond Chandler
  • The Sign of Four (120th) – Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Baudolino (10th) – Umberto Eco
  • The Name of the Rose (30th) – Umberto Eco
  • LA Confidential (20th) – James Ellroy
  • As I Lay Dying (80th) – William Faulkner
  • Love in the Time of Cholera (25th) – Gabriel García Márquez
  • The Difference Engine (20th) – William Gibson and Bruce Sterling
  • The Marble Faun (150th) – Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls (70th) – Ernest Hemingway
  • The Cider House Rules (25th) – John Irving
  • Tristessa (50th) – Jack Kerouac
  • To Kill a Mockingbird (50th) – Harper Lee
  • A Canticle for Leibowitz (50th) – Walter M. Miller
  • Ringworld (40th) – Larry Niven
  • The Violent Bear It Away (50th) – Flannery O’Connor
  • Hemingway’s Chair (15th) – Michael Palin
  • Good Omens (20th) – Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
  • Still Life with Woodpecker (30th) – Tom Robbins
  • Contact (25th) – Carl Sagan
  • Green Eggs and Discount pill viagra Ham (50th) – Dr. Seuss
  • One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (50th) – Dr. Seuss
  • Zeitgeist (10th) – Bruce Sterling
  • The Artificial Kid (30th) – Bruce Sterling
  • A Confederacy of Dunces (30th) – John Kennedy Toole
  • The Accidental Tourist (25th) – Anne Tyler
  • Hocus Pocus (20th) – Kurt Vonnegut
  • The Age of Innocence (90th) – Edith Wharton
  • Mrs. Dalloway (85th) – Virginia Woolf

Top 25 Favorite Writers

Much like for my favorite movies, here is a list of my Top 25 favorite writers.

  1. Vladimir Nabokov
  2. Ray Bradbury
  3. JRR Tolkien
  4. Kurt Vonnegut
  5. Douglas Adams
  6. Ursula K Le Guin
  7. Mark Twain

The rest in alphabetical order by last name:

  • Charlotte Brontë
  • Emily Brontë
  • Albert Camus
  • Raymond Chandler
  • Umberto Eco
  • James Ellroy
  • William Gibson
  • Spalding Gray
  • Franz Kafka
  • Milan Kundera
  • George Orwell
  • Dorothy Parker
  • Edgar Allan Poe
  • Muriel Spark
  • Bram Stoker
  • Jules Verne
  • Edith Wharton
  • HG Wells

Honorable Mentions

  • Jane Austen
  • Robert Benchley
  • George Carlin
  • Philip K Dick
  • Ernest Hemingway
  • Jack Kerouac
  • Flannery O’Connor
  • William Shakespeare
  • Mary Shelley
  • Neal Stephenson
  • John Steinbeck
  • Bruce Sterling
  • Hunter S Thompson
  • Virginia Woolf
  • Oscar Wilde
  • PG Wodehouse